JASS Blog

by Rosanna Langara on June 18, 2021 on 9:27 am

"At its very core, Pride is, and will always be, a protest; Pride means fighting back..." Read this emotive blog about Bahaghari Philippines, an LGBTQ+ group fighting for their rights to exist - be seen and valued - in an hostile environment.

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by Daysi Yamileth Flores Hernandez on September 7, 2016 on 12:32 pm

The skies wept as together we received the month of September in the town of La Esperanza, Honduras. Hundreds of visitors brought with them hearts that beat to the rhythms of their struggles, their love and the many colors of their dreams; they brought their cameras, drums, pens, and the united cry to demand once and for all: Justice for Berta!

by JASS on August 14, 2016 on 2:53 pm

“We find ourselves in a crisis. There are no jobs. There is no cash. Basically everything is a problem,” says Mai Sputi, In the wake of many protests that have erupted in Zimbabwe, JASS' Winnet Shanuyarira spotlights the role women have been playing in calling for change.

by JASS on June 2, 2016 on 3:18 pm

"As women struggle for the biodiversity of the planet, defend livelihoods threatened by mining and extractives, and put their lives on the line, we need to prioritise the protection of WHRDs." JASS Southern Africa’s Winnet Shamuyarira reflects on defenders across Africa and their fight for the right to lands, livelihoods and life.

by Niken Lestari on May 31, 2016 on 3:39 am

The majority of indigenous women of Indonesia face multiple challenges in their daily lives: being a woman, being an indigenous woman, and being a rural poor indigenous woman. For Pipi Supeni, an indigenous woman from the Dayak Benuaq tribe of East Kalimantan, being constantly in the margins is not a hopeless situation. Representing her organizations, she leads her community in raising indigenous women’s awareness of their rights. Read more…

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by JASS on May 10, 2016 on 3:25 am

“I now know how to use a tablet which is not a norm in Malawi because [many believe] tablets cannot and should not be used by a local woman like me,” says woman activist leader Jessie Mwale of Mzimba, Malawi. “But because [of this skill I am empowered and I have knowledge.” 

Mobile phones in the hands of women activist leaders can be powerful tools to drive movements and campaigns. Because mobile phones are a personal part of our daily lives, they have the potential to reach and impact thousands more people.

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