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This session, which uses the JASS Southern Africa framework and video as it’s core outline, will look at HIV/AIDS from the lens of power and inequality in order to define the many ways that this urgent challenge facing women presents opportunities for movement-building and energizing women's rights agendas.
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The International AIDS Conference in Mexico City, August 3-8, 2008 provided an important opportunity for JASS activists to understand, face-to-face, the politics and actors dominating global decision-making on HIV/AIDS and to make their voices heard at this important international gathering. The JASS delegation was comprised of seven Southern African activists, five Mesoamerican activists – including two journalists from JASS’ strategic partner, Feminist International Radio Endeavor (FIRE) based in Costa Rica – and three members of the JASS crossregional team.
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Organizing in Zimbabwe has been challenging, even dangerous, for some years. As the country’s economic crisis has deepened – with measurable inflation reaching 79,600,000,000% monthly and 98% daily in November 2008 – activists have had to pit themselves against repressive laws and actions such as Operation Murambatsvina, a wave of brutal urban clearance, beginning in 2005 and repeated since, that has affected an estimated 2.4 million Zimbabweans.
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This report is the result of monitoring and critical analyses by non-government organizations (NGO) in Indonesia concerning the implementation of CEDAWthroughout the years 1998-2007. It is made on the basis of the mechanism of the CEDAW committee that makes it possible for non-government organizations to propose a shadow report as a counterpart/ alternative report to the report prepared by the Government of the Republic of Indonesia.
An op-ed written by Lisa VeneKlasen and JASS board member, Emira Woods, on the election of Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf as President of Liberia.
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The successes achieved by social justice advocates at a series of important UN and other international gatherings throughout the 1990s molded transnational civil society strategies and in many ways, raised expectations about what is possible. In addition to policy gains, these efforts managed to shift the discourses of gender equality, sustainable development, and human rights and helped to forge national and international movements and alliances.
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