Economic justice

Plenary speech by Lisa VeneKlasen to the 2005 Annual Conference of the Women's Funding Network.
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Paper written by Lisa VeneKlasen for AWID's Gender Justice & Globalization Strategy Meeting.
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“Challenging patriarchy does not necessarily mean getting into positions of power,” explains Amporn Boontan, Thailand’s regional coordinating group (RCG) representative for JASS Southeast Asia, after having been recently elected as a Sub-district Committee Leader of the Women's Empowerment Fund. “I can use this role to start something. Women are actually waiting for action,” explains Amporn.
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Access to and control over resources is about power. Today, the ferocious scramble to control and exploit resources—from land and forests to technology and human DNA—is a scramble for power. This session will explore women’s access and control of resources from a feminist movement-builder’s perspective.
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This presentation is from Women’s Organizing for Economic Rights and Democracy in Southeast Asia, a breakout session at the AWID 2012 Internation Forum on Women's Rights and Development. Around the world, access to cash and credit through microfinancing programs is touted as a magic bullet for eradicating women’s poverty. Yet, there is limited evidence that these strategies alone fundamentally alter the power relationships that drive women’s poverty in the first place.
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A report prepared for the Economic Literacy Project, IDS.
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Neoliberalism has spawned a swath of oppositional movements.The more clearly oppositional movements recognize that their central objective must be to confront the class power that has been so effectively restored under neoliberalization, the more they will likely themselves cohere.
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Access to and control over resources is about power. Today, the ferocious scramble to control and exploit resources—from land and forests to technology and human DNA—is a scramble for power. This session will explore women’s access and control of resources from a feminist movement-builder’s perspective.
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It’s easy to assume that global economics are value-neutral and simply reflect the “natural” order of things. In reality, our economic world order is shaped by distinct ideologies and beliefs about who should have access to and control over what resources, such as education, property, credit, and even time. The predominant paradigm is based on neoliberal and capitalist principles that promote free markets, unregulated trade, consumer-driven growth, and privatization of essential services, for example. But genuine alternatives exist and have always existed.
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Access to healthcare - HIV+ women are dependent on the failing infrastructure for information, treatment including ARVs, and care.

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