From women’s individual and collective power to political change PEKKA: Integrated approaches to movement-building and social accountability

By: 
Nani Zulminarni and Valerie Miller

Building on previous writings by Annie Holmes, Alia Khan, Lisa VeneKlasen, Alexa Bradley, this case study examines how a grassroots economic and political organizing approach works to transform the lives of women heads of household—in effect, the poorest of the poor—by applying a combination of feminist popular education, community organizing processes and the building of cooperative forms of saving and microfinance.  It examines how they influence key government policies and legal systems and how they hold government accountable, often in highly unfavorable circumstances of repression and prejudice. This case study was presented at the Scaling Accountability: Integrated Approaches to Civil Society Monitoring and Advocacy workshop organised by the Transparency and Accountability Initiative, School of International Service at American University, the International Budget Partnership and Government Watch of Ateneo School of Government, held 18-20 June 2015, in Washington, D.C and also shared at the TALEARN workshop (November 2015) where we shared our movement building expertise and shaped the dialogue to this key field of donors, researchers and development practitioners.