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“I believe that in the midst of all that despair, we need to nurture hope in ourselves as women, to believe that we are capable, that it’s possible to do something on behalf of our people.” – Berta Cáceres, 2014 It’s been a troubling week in troubling times. In the face of political fear mongering, people across the world have pulled together and amplified demands for change. Mourning and mobilizing is how love conquers hate.
First, a message of solidarity to the families and friends of those injured and killed in the recent Manchester bombing and to all those throughout the Middle East who continue to suffer from ceaseless wars. This sustained violence feeds on and fuels fear, anger and hatred—the key ingredients that serve to legitimize more weapons and more restrictions on basic rights. As we mourn, we must also untangle and change the policies and politics of inequality, discrimination, and dislocation that spark this violence.
JASS
Global South perspectives from JASS’ regions: hear from different JASS staff from around the world on  How to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 5 (gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls) in a context of closing civic space and increased violence? Investments in women’s political education, organizing and movement-building across social movements is essential for: Building constituencies and strong civic engagement for accountability
The Count Me In! Consortium stands in solidarity with our Zimbabwean sisters in protest of the armed forces' sexual violence against women. 
JASS
JASS collaborated with filmmakers Maria del Pilar Godoy and Renato Martínez to develop this short documentary on women within the migrant caravan travelling through Central America and Mexico in 2018. 
Count Me In! Consortium
The Count Me In! Consortium, integrated by Mama Cash, AWID, JASS, CREA and the Urgent Action Funds, expresses its concern and rejection towards the escalation of violence against human rights defenders, journalists, feminists, social movements and civil society organizations in Nicaragua.
Margo Okazawa-Rey and JASS
A contextual analysis of Southeast Asia highlighting the ways that ordinary people, activists, human rights defenders, and social movements are organizing to protect their communities from destruction and injustice, even in extremely precarious and dangerous situations
If there is one thing we can say about this past year, it is that 2017 was the year of women. Find out why in our annual report! Cover photo credit: Center for Women's Resources (CWR)
JASS' Adelaide Mazwarira sits down with JASS supporter and ambassador, Marg VeneKlasen, to ask her how she became bold. Her answer will inspire you!
Central America and Mexico – and the United States too – have become places in which too many women’s lives don’t matter. It’s time for a change.

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