Women's Stories

When Manohara and her fellow activists came together to form the Women’s Equality Association (WEA) in 2012, they thought, “Maybe we should form a women’s shelter where we will do real work.” In the beginning, the foremost question that they had in mind was, “What are we going to do that is different from others?”
Keywords:
“I feel like I have choices. Like whether or not I want to bear children. Feminism has allowed me to think that there’s more than doing what you’re ‘supposed’ to do — you have a right to choose.”
Keywords:
These days, Cristina lives in Guerrero, one of the most impoverished and militarized municipalities in Mexico. But her journey as a human rights activist began in Mexico City as a university student protesting alongside the women of Chihuahua and Ciudad Juárez about the rise in femicides and the disappearances of women.
Keywords:
When I first met Siti Harsun, my impression was of a quiet girl and a warm smile. But I soon learned not to be fooled by her appearance. Beneath her gentle manner, Harsun is a fierce organizer. Once our discussion turned to food security, her soft voice became fiery and filled with indignation.
Topic:
Keywords:
It’s not easy to identify yourself as a feminist in Zambia. You risk violent backlash or isolation in your community, workplace, and relationships. For Nana Zulu, her first contact with JASS in 2009 raised the question: What does it mean to be a feminist in Zambia today?
Topic:
Keywords:
Wendy Maw is a 21-year-old trailblazer from Burma. “I need to learn a lot of new things. I have a huge task being a trainer in human rights education. I have to give the right message to the people.”
Keywords:
“When you are talking with women, sometimes there is difficulty in language.  I come from West Java which has a different language from West and South Sumatra.  Most of the people from South Sumatra cannot understand the Bahasa language easily as they have a different provincial dialect,” reveals Oemi Faezathi, community organizer of PEKKA.   This is where media tools come in.  
Keywords:
Aura Lolita Chavez Ixcaquic, known as Lolita is a leader of the Council of K’iche’ Peoples in Defense of Life, Mother Nature, Earth and Territory (CPK). Her organization groups 87 communities and their traditional authorities that work to protect their lands, resources and territory.
Keywords:
Women are too often the object of violence and the face of poverty,” explains Jean Stokan, Director of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas’ Institute Justice Team. Given women’s marginalization due to racism, sexism and their socio-economic status, it is no surprise that working to free women from these oppressive forces is among the five priority concerns of the Sisters of Mercy.
Keywords:
“Challenging patriarchy does not necessarily mean getting into positions of power,” explains Amporn Boontan, Thailand’s regional coordinating group (RCG) representative for JASS Southeast Asia, after having been recently elected as a Sub-district Committee Leader of the Women's Empowerment Fund. “I can use this role to start something. Women are actually waiting for action,” explains Amporn.
Keywords:

Pages

Subscribe to Women's Stories