grassroots movements

This beautiful new Barefoot Guide, published by JASS-ally The Barefoot Guide Connection, dedicates Chapter 1 to JASS’ movement building work with HIV+ women organizing for health justice in Malawi.
Everywhere at the Human Rights Council (HRC) the catchphrase on everyone’s tongue was “shrinking spaces for civil society”. But what does it mean, really? How are activists grappling with this “shrinking space” in their work? To try and find out a little more, JASS Southern Africa's Maggie Mapondera interviewed activists from as far afield as Mongolia, Brazil and India to learn from their experiences and analysis.
I read Ngugi wa Thiongo’s The Trial of Dedani Kimathi years back when I was still in lower secondary school. The character that sticks with me most since that time is the woman political activist who works to support the liberation movement. She smuggles a gun into the courtroom by storing it in a loaf of bread with its insides removed expertly for that purpose. She is an ordinary market woman but uses her agency as part of the formidable people’s liberation movement to unseat colonialism in Kenya.
“No, I can't write about myself! What should I write? I am embarrassed!” cried Swita, a 24-year-old activist. Swita works at Yayasan Harapan Ibu (Mother's Hope Foundation) and organizes women sex workers in Jayapura, Papua Province in Indonesia.
Today, JASS honors the Mesoamerican Women Human Rights Defenders Initiative, a political alliance that strengthens and mobilizes women human rights defenders in the volatile and increasingly violent contexts of Mesoamerica.
The Just Transition framework presents a holistic model of system change, from extractive profiteering towards "ecological restoration, community resilience, and social equity." Drawing from our own experience and concepts, JASS staff review both the strengths and the challenges in advancing this timely model.
In this thought-provoking article, Hope Chigudu shares her inspiring words on the importance of "planting seeds of empowerment in a disempowering context" as she describes the journey of Malawian HIV positive women's courageous fight for decent for health care resources and the rewards that came with it.
Leaders of the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH)—Berta Cáceres, Tomás Gómez Membreño, and Aureliano Molina—have been erroneously charged with illegal land seizure, coercion, and damages for organizing the Rio Blanco community to protect their ancestral territories from companies that have begun building a dam on
This case study shares the experiences and perceptions of HIV positive women in Malawi who have organized to change how they view themselves, how they are treated and how to demand their right to decent health care.

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