Zimbabwe

Power point presentation highlighting how far JASS has come since 2010. What has JASS learned as organization? What has happened by the 3 regions? What are the goals for the future?
A presentation of JASS' progress since 2006 and strategies moving forward. The presentation highlights themes such as JASS' community, relationships, reputation, and power.
The JASS community is steeped in a particularly political way of learning, analyzing, and taking action. From the beginning, this approach – feminist popular education – has shaped JASS’ vision and strategies. In 2011, JASS undertook a series of activities that highlighted what this approach has meant to the work. Drawing on the thinking and experience of many pioneering popular educators within the network, JASS set out to better understand and define how feminist popular education shapes our movement-building in different contexts.
As social, political and economic instability dominates headlines worldwide, members of JASS’ international community are providing their own take on what this means for women’s rights, equality, and wellbeing. Check out JASS’ up-to-the-minute frontline analyses on patriarchy, feminist movement building and security from our annual Crossregional Dialogue in April.
Keywords:
Developing a critical political consciousness is at the core of JASS’ feminist movement building strategies. Popular education, or more specifically, feminist popular education, has long served as a conceptual and methodological foundation for JASS’ activist training, learning, organizing, and action.
Self-care and wellbeing have made a welcome comeback in feminist politics. They have been around for decades, but drifted out of focus and out of favor around the early 1990s as the dominant trends in women’s rights work took other turns. In some respects, the focus on policy and legal rights advocacy, important as that has been and continues to be for fighting inequality and advancing women’s rights, also came along with an unhelpful disconnect and hierarchy between needs and rights.
Keywords:
“Are you homosexual?” was the question Uganda’s Minister for Ethics and Integrity asked minutes before he disbanded a young LGBT activist leadership workshop in Kampala. JASS’ Hope Chigudu, who was there supporting a workshop of young activists, says, “Fear and rage. I’ve never felt such fear and rage as I did when Lokodo invaded our space at that workshop.
Keywords:
“How has the political crisis of the early 2000s --- along with increasing violence and economic insecurity -- demobilised and divided women’s organising efforts in Zimbabwe—or has it? What kinds of innovative, brave organising have emerged in Zimbabwe in a context of violence and political repression?” As Zimbabwe approaches elections, fanning fears of renewed violence, these are just some of the questions 16 women activists grappled with at The Changing Face of Women’s Activism and Feminist Action in Zimbabwe held in Harare (March 28th – 29th 2012).
Keywords:
A JASS founder and former board member, Hope has gone on to play a huge role – on the ground and on the page – in shaping the power of JASS’ program in Malawi. Always alive to the potential for creativity to shake things up, Hope asks unexpected questions, shattering the mold of mainstream-NGO workshops and inviting HIV-positive activists into holistic processes that have healed, empowered, and galvanized them.
Topic:
Keywords:
Dudziro’s experience ranges from King College, London, to a market stall in Harare, and from editing fiction to researching political violence. The feminist spark that unites all this disparate energy was first lit at the African Gender Institute at the University of Cape Town where Dudziro went for post-graduate studies. A six-month Kings College research fellowship on peace and security then fanned the flame and today Dudziro is passionately committed to ending discrimination and violence against women.
Topic:
Keywords:

Pages

Subscribe to Zimbabwe